A Flapper’s Frappé for a Summery Day

Pen and ink drawing by renowned 1920s illustrator, John Barbour from "The Designer & The Woman's Magazine" July 1921
Pen and ink drawing by renowned 1920s illustrator, John Barbour from “The Designer & The Woman’s Magazine” July 1921 at thegildedtimes.wordpress.com

U.S. Prohibition outlawed the sale of alcoholic beverages between 1920 through 1933. Recipes for elaborate non-alcoholic drinks began to appear in every magazine and newspaper, with the hope of quenching that nagging thirst…but it was a thirst that was only satiated within the world of underground speakeasies resulting in high stakes crime.

“Frappés are frozen just half-way between a punch and an ice” stated cooking author Mary Mason Wright in the July 1921 issue of The Designer and Women’s Magazine. She added that this beverage style could also be served as a substitute for soup courses during hot weather. The name is derived from the base of black india tea.

India Frappé

2 cups sugar     1 cup water
1 cup fruit juice: pineapple, currant, cherry, strawberry or grape
3 juiced oranges        2 juiced lemons
1 pint cold black india tea
crushed fresh raspberries or bananas

“Boil the sugar and water to a sirup (sic),
then when cool add the fruit-juices.”

“Add the tea and enough (additional) water
to make two quarts and freeze to a mushy consistency.
Then add a cup of crushed fruit.”

Add a sprig of mint and a slice of orange to garnish each glass.

…and for those who might enjoy a little 1920s speakeasy nostalgia…
simply add one shot of citrus infused vodka to each glass, and shake.

Serves 8



Original text & photographs ©2014 Julia Henri
Please use citations and references to The Gilded Times.
http://www.thegildedtimes.wordpress.com
http://www.thegildedtimes.com



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The Gilded Times

Journalist. Photographer. Illustrator.

2 thoughts on “A Flapper’s Frappé for a Summery Day”

    1. Thank you so very much for *Following* this blog and for trying the recipe.
      The next blog entry for this week follows up with more historical recipes
      from 1926.I hope you’ll try at least one of these as well and let us
      know what you think! Again, we were so surprised as to just how easy and
      quick the recipes turned out to be. Most of all, we were delighted
      with such flavorful results! Thanks again for your thoughts and comments! – Julia

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